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Revealed : 5 Things Christians should Stop Posting On Facebook

Despite the flaws of social media, it can be a powerful force to share God’s amazing love over the long run. Our witness can be deeply powerful when our unbelieving friends see our continued faithfulness year after year and our hope of glory in the midst of pain (Colossians 1:27).

But that doesn’t mean everything we share on Facebook contributes to this witness. In fact, there are some types of updates we Christians share that, for the most part, do more damage than good.

1355746343_FacebookShop

Here are five status update traps to avoid:

1. Pastor So-and-So is a Big Ol’ Heretic

Imagine, if you will, your unbelieving friends tap into their Facebook app, and the first update they see is you complaining (again) about that pastor you love to complain about. You know the one. You mention, for the third time this week, another thing he taught that is heretical, and you make sure everyone knows it.

First of all, we absolutely must call out false teaching. Jesus laid the groundwork for this when He rebuked the Pharisees and scribes for their hypocrisy (Matthew 23). Paul and John weren’t afraid to point out many false teachers in their letters. So, that’s not the issue.

The issue is that your unbelieving friends don’t know all this. What they see, instead, is one Christian attacking another Christian for what seems like a minor matter. Such updates make it look like we spend most of our time beating each other up instead of doing that “love thing” we claim to do. (Think about how Pilate and other Roman officials responded to the complaints the Jews brought against Jesus and Paul. They didn’t see the difference; they just saw what looked like petty jealousy and bickering to them.)

Calling out false teaching is much better done in personal settings with other believers or in a private way with someone who isn’t a believer—and usually when you have time to really explain. The context is very important here. Slapping it all over Facebook makes the church seem hypocritical and hyper-judgmental.

2. Some People Just Don’t Know How Much Pain They Cause

Trust us. We get it. Someone talks about you behind your back or lies to your face. It makes you mad. You want to vent, but you don’t necessarily want to give all the details to everyone. So, up on Facebook goes a passive-aggressive post that you hope the person sees.

Maybe they will, or maybe they won’t. Either way, this isn’t what Jesus meant about us approaching that person privately to discuss the problem (Matthew 18:15–18). More than likely, you’ve made your innocent friends feel like maybe they were the ones who hurt you in some way, but they don’t know how. Now they’re paranoid.

If you need to vent, do it to someone you trust in person so that they can bear your burden (Galatians 6:2). Don’t post that vague status update.

3. Something Terrible Just Happened to So-and-So. Please Pray for the Family.

Requests for prayer can be very tricky matters on Facebook. For one thing, always-on Internet means that we can now get updates in seconds. That adds a new level of responsibility, especially in tragedy.

When something bad happens, we want people to be praying for those involved. That’s a good thing. But if we post an update about it on Facebook as soon as it happens, there’s a very good chance that family members and close friends who haven’t been notified yet could get the news through cold digital bits along with lots of strangers. That makes it even worse—especially if they don’t know all the details. At that point, our prayer request doesn’t bring the comfort we’re supposed to bring (1 Corinthians 1:3–4).

It’s much better for us to hold off on the post until we’re sure everyone knows the news (but see the next point). If you need to get prayer warriors going, text or call them directly.

4. Please Pray for So-and-So’s Failing Marriage and the Bad Rash on His Back

Another potential problem with Facebook prayer requests is TMI (too much information). Most of the time, we like to be specific about what we’re asking prayer for, and there’s nothing wrong with pointing to a specific need (Philippians 4:6)—in the right setting.

Not every single one of your hundreds of friends needs to know all the details about a sickness, relationship struggle, or other personal matter. In fact, those details could cause problems later for the people you want to help. (Remember that whatever you post on Facebook will likely be “out there” forever—even if you think you deleted it.)

It would be much better for us Christians to gather together in person and pray for these needs. Grab friends and family who know the details and pray right there with the people who need it (James 5:16). If they don’t live close by, use FaceTime or Skype.

5. If You Don’t Support Such-and-Such Cause/Candidate, Just Unfriend Me Now!!!

Court rulings, elections, and world events can certainly get us mad and make us want to take to social media to explain just how mad we are. But no cause should be more important to a Christian than the Great Commission (Matthew 28:19–20). Court rulings and elected officials come and go, but making disciples lasts forever.

When we post our anger on Facebook, we can—unwittingly—give our unbelieving friends the idea that what’s most important to us is politics. They may think that being a Christian means having a certain set of political opinions—not a life-changing relationship with Jesus. Worse yet, they might take you up on your offer to stop listening to you by unfriending you. That’s one less Christian witness in their lives.

That doesn’t mean we should never post on controversial topics. Instead, it means that we must weigh our words very carefully and speak the truth with gentleness (1 Peter 3:15). Lashing out or making threats to unfriend does not qualify. (If someone in particular bothers you, you can always “unfollow” their updates for a time.)

You’ll probably get mad at something that happens, and maybe an unbelieving friend will post something about it that drives you to distraction. But—and this is big—they aren’t saved. They’ve been blinded by the god of this age (2 Corinthians 4:4). Show them grace. They need it—even if you’re sure they’re wrong.

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The Love of GOD : Muslims Raise Funds To Re-Build Burn’t CHURCHES

CNN

 

Photo courtesy
Photo courtesy

Several black churches across the South have burned in recent weeks, some due to what is believed to be arson, while others fell victim to natural disasters such as lightning.

The destruction of these black churches inspired a group of young Muslims from different parts of the country to put together a crowdfunding campaign to raise money to help rebuild them.

Faatimah Knight, a 23-year-old studying theology, started a campaign on LaunchGood with a group of friends to raise $50,000 during the month of Ramadan, a holy month for Muslims during which they fast and give alms.

The initial goal for the campaign was only $10,000, but the group surpassed that mark in just 12 hours after they launched. “Nearly broke the LaunchGood servers!” The website’s Facebook page posted.

On the campaign’s page, Knight writes, “All houses of worship are sanctuaries… let’s unite to help our sisters and brothers in faith.”

But there was more than just religion that compelled Knight to start the fundraiser with her four other friends. She felt a personal connection to the recent tragedies.

“Supporting these churches hit me most as a black person,” the Brooklyn resident said. “It has been a challenging time to be black in America.”

On June 17, Dylann Roof allegedly killed nine members of Charleston’s Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Four days later, black churches began burning across the South.

The NAACP, which acknowledged that only three of the recent church fires are thought to be arson-related, said the blazes require “our collective attention.”

Regardless of why or how these churches were burned down, the campaign has seen an overwhelming support since it launched in early July. It has already raised more than $48,000, and with a few days left, Knight is confident they will reach their goal.

“The response has been overwhelmingly supportive. There have been a few people who were confused about why Muslims would rebuild a church, but for the most part people are totally on board,” she said.

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Link News 8

5 Things Christians Should STOP Saying On Facebook

Despite the flaws of social media, it can be a powerful force to share God’s amazing love over the long run. Our witness can be deeply powerful when our unbelieving friends see our continued faithfulness year after year and our hope of glory in the midst of pain (Colossians 1:27).
But that doesn’t mean everything we share on Facebook contributes to this witness. In fact, there are some types of updates we Christians share that, for the most part, do more damage than good.

1355746343_FacebookShop

Here are five status update traps to avoid:

1. Pastor So-and-So is a Big Ol’ Heretic

Imagine, if you will, your unbelieving friends tap into their Facebook app, and the first update they see is you complaining (again) about that pastor you love to complain about. You know the one. You mention, for the third time this week, another thing he taught that is heretical, and you make sure everyone knows it.
First of all, we absolutely must call out false teaching. Jesus laid the groundwork for this when He rebuked the Pharisees and scribes for their hypocrisy (Matthew 23). Paul and John weren’t afraid to point out many false teachers in their letters. So, that’s not the issue.
The issue is that your unbelieving friends don’t know all this. What they see, instead, is one Christian attacking another Christian for what seems like a minor matter. Such updates make it look like we spend most of our time beating each other up instead of doing that “love thing” we claim to do. (Think about how Pilate and other Roman officials responded to the complaints the Jews brought against Jesus and Paul. They didn’t see the difference; they just saw what looked like petty jealousy and bickering to them.)
Calling out false teaching is much better done in personal settings with other believers or in a private way with someone who isn’t a believer—and usually when you have time to really explain. The context is very important here. Slapping it all over Facebook makes the church seem hypocritical and hyper-judgmental.

2. Some People Just Don’t Know How Much Pain They Cause

Trust us. We get it. Someone talks about you behind your back or lies to your face. It makes you mad. You want to vent, but you don’t necessarily want to give all the details to everyone. So, up on Facebook goes a passive-aggressive post that you hope the person sees.
Maybe they will, or maybe they won’t. Either way, this isn’t what Jesus meant about us approaching that person privately to discuss the problem (Matthew 18:15–18). More than likely, you’ve made your innocent friends feel like maybe they were the ones who hurt you in some way, but they don’t know how. Now they’re paranoid.
If you need to vent, do it to someone you trust in person so that they can bear your burden (Galatians 6:2). Don’t post that vague status update.

3. Something Terrible Just Happened to So-and-So. Please Pray for the Family.

Requests for prayer can be very tricky matters on Facebook. For one thing, always-on Internet means that we can now get updates in seconds. That adds a new level of responsibility, especially in tragedy.
When something bad happens, we want people to be praying for those involved. That’s a good thing. But if we post an update about it on Facebook as soon as it happens, there’s a very good chance that family members and close friends who haven’t been notified yet could get the news through cold digital bits along with lots of strangers. That makes it even worse—especially if they don’t know all the details. At that point, our prayer request doesn’t bring the comfort we’re supposed to bring (1 Corinthians 1:3–4).
It’s much better for us to hold off on the post until we’re sure everyone knows the news (but see the next point). If you need to get prayer warriors going, text or call them directly.

4. Please Pray for So-and-So’s Failing Marriage and the Bad Rash on His Back

Another potential problem with Facebook prayer requests is TMI (too much information). Most of the time, we like to be specific about what we’re asking prayer for, and there’s nothing wrong with pointing to a specific need (Philippians 4:6)—in the right setting.
Not every single one of your hundreds of friends needs to know all the details about a sickness, relationship struggle, or other personal matter. In fact, those details could cause problems later for the people you want to help. (Remember that whatever you post on Facebook will likely be “out there” forever—even if you think you deleted it.)
It would be much better for us Christians to gather together in person and pray for these needs. Grab friends and family who know the details and pray right there with the people who need it (James 5:16). If they don’t live close by, use FaceTime or Skype.

5. If You Don’t Support Such-and-Such Cause/Candidate, Just Unfriend Me Now!!!

Court rulings, elections, and world events can certainly get us mad and make us want to take to social media to explain just how mad we are. But no cause should be more important to a Christian than the Great Commission (Matthew 28:19–20). Court rulings and elected officials come and go, but making disciples lasts forever.
When we post our anger on Facebook, we can—unwittingly—give our unbelieving friends the idea that what’s most important to us is politics. They may think that being a Christian means having a certain set of political opinions—not a life-changing relationship with Jesus. Worse yet, they might take you up on your offer to stop listening to you by unfriending you. That’s one less Christian witness in their lives.
That doesn’t mean we should never post on controversial topics. Instead, it means that we must weigh our words very carefully and speak the truth with gentleness (1 Peter 3:15). Lashing out or making threats to unfriend does not qualify. (If someone in particular bothers you, you can always “unfollow” their updates for a time.)
You’ll probably get mad at something that happens, and maybe an unbelieving friend will post something about it that drives you to distraction. But—and this is big—they aren’t saved. They’ve been blinded by the god of this age (2 Corinthians 4:4). Show them grace. They need it—even if you’re sure they’re wrong.

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Link News 2

3 Reasons Why You Should Sing Loudly In Church

I have been singing since the fifth grade. I’ve been in audition-only honors choirs, taken voice lessons, sang in musicals, and even toured Ireland and Scotland with my college chorale.

singing in church

 

And I have a confession. Sometimes, I don’t sing in church.

There is just something about singing in church that feels different than singing with a school choir. Hymns are different than choir arrangements. The tune is usually simple enough for a congregation to figure it out without hours of rehearsals and the old-English lyrics are sometimes confusing.

What is a bulwark (“A Mighty Fortress is Our God)? What is a buckler (“For We Are Strangers No More”)? Why are we raising our Ebenezer (Come Thy Font of Every Blessing) and are we talking about Ebenezer Scrooge, from Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”?

These are questions that I have asked myself while singing hymns After doing some research, I did find out that a bulwark is a wall, a buckler is a shield, and Ebenezer was a rock that Samuel raised in the air saying that God had helped the Israelitesdefeat the Philistines (1 Samuel 7:12). Still, it is easy to get stuck on the confusing words and whisper to the person next to you, “Hey, what is a bulwark, anyway?”

But if we fail to sing in church, we are missing out on a major component of worship.

Christians come to church, pray in church and listen in church. And when it comes time to sing, some of us stand there awkwardly, mouthing the words, or busy ourselves getting a tissue out of our purse.

What is up with that?

Here are three main reasons why we need to stop this, and sing to our God.

1. We are commanded to sing. 

It is right there in the Bible. scripture commands us to sing over 250 times. “It’s not a choice. It’s not dependent on ‘feeling like it,’ he writes.

Here it is in Psalm 100:1-2 (KJV): “Make a joyful noise unto the Lord, all ye lands. Serve the Lord with gladness: come before his presence with singing.”

I suddenly feel very guilty. Refusing to sing in church is openly defying scripture. If that doesn’t motivate you to start singing praises, I do not know what will.

2. Singing together completes our joy and expresses our solidarity. 

What is the difference between singing in church to watching March Madness?

In the same way, singing in church completes our experience of worship. “Singing together reminds us — not just intellectually, but experientially — that we are not slaves to the rugged individualism promoted by society. We’re actually responsible to one another.”

3. Singing affects us emotionally and bears testimony to our faith.

“We are what we sing.” Music affects us on a deeply emotional level, whether we are aware of it or not. In my grandfather’s final days, he did not remember his grandson’s name and could not accomplish ordinary tasks, but could still recite the line of the hymns that he studied every week for years. “When we are intentional about singing and the songs we sing, we build up a testimony that will travel with us through life,” Getty says.

Singing praises is also a way of giving our testimony. Do we want to look like an “excited believer” or a “disinterested spectator” to those who see us in church? Remember, not everyone in church is a Christian. There are visitors and there are those who attend but do not truly believe. Your singing can inspire those around you to turn to the One for whom you sing praises.

“Ultimately, those who may feel they are on the outside looking in will, from the deepest part of themselves, respond to authentic and passionate singing to discover the truth held in the God songs we sing.”

And that, brothers and sisters, is truly a reason to sing.

 

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CHURCH HERO : Chinese Man Bravely Fights 3 Armed Robbers In A Nairobi Church But Gets Injured

A Chinese man was on Sunday injured on the left shoulder after he fought some 3 suspected armed robbers who stormed into a church in Nairobi.

Photo courtesy
Photo courtesy

Mr You Do You who was part of the congregation at Spiritual Recovery Church in Kilimani was one of the victims of the incident that took place on Sunday.

You Do You was injured after he wrestled three armed suspected robbers who had entered the church and ordered the congregation to lie down before robbing them.

Confirming the incident at Vigilance House, police spokesperson Zipporah Mboroki said three men, one armed with a pistol, entered the church and ordered everyone to lie down and proceeded to rob them.

Ms Mboroki said that the robbers made a way with a handbag containing an LG mobile phone valued Sh40,000 and other personal effects belonging to one Kamene Kitheka and an Inifinx phone valued at Sh2,500.

The spokesman added that the gang also stole Sh6,000 belonging to a Chinese national Kim Si Jun and a Nokia phone and Sh9,000 from Pastor John Kimei who was presiding over the service.

(c) Nairobi News

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The Cross Is Illegal ? : Church Members Tearfully Sing After Church Cross Is Forcefully Removed

Wenzhou City, China – Christians are vowing to stand firm for Christ amid much persecution by officials in a Chinese province where church buildings continue to be demolished, and where believers in a recent video can be seen bursting into tearful song about the cross and how their sins were washed away by the blood of Jesus while the cross atop their building is forcibly removed.

Cross-Removed post

Within a week after pastors and church members from various congregations wrote objections  concerning the ongoing abuse in a published letter to the government in Wenzhou City, which is located in
the country’s Zhejiang Province, authorities removed the cross on the roof of Yahui Church in the city.

Church members were also threatened with harm if  they talked to the media or petitioned Beijing, according to a report by International Christian Concern (ICC).

The public letter, which the Chinese government has since blocked the content of on websites within mainland China, listed eight reasons why “the anti-church campaign is an abnormally illegal administrative action that is abusing authority and ignoring the rule of law.”

They claimed that China’s Administrative Punishment Law requires advanced notice before the government’s compulsory execution. However, the government’s demolition teams usually show up at churches in the middle of the night, without legal documents, and began the demolition process under the cover of darkness.
In addition, Chinese Christians argued that, even if a cross is illegal, the law demands that the demolition team should be from the Religious Bureau or the Housing and City Planning Bureau.
However, the demolition team is usually made up of unidentified personnel, police, and SWAT—a
clear violation of procedure and the rights of the believers.
It is reported that over 360 churches in Zhejiang Province have been completely or partially
demolished under the guise of “removing or modifying illegal constructions.” The government of
Zhejiang Province says it is removing or modifying illegal buildings for urban development.
ICC reports, however, that the target has been religious buildings at the exclusion of all others, and has received a list of 15 churches in Pingyang County alone that are facing cross demolition by the end of this month.
It is widely believed that the campaign is exclusively targeting Christian churches.
“The campaign has been unbridled and the government demolishes church crosses recklessly,” said a local church member, according to the release.
Not long after the public letter was published, ICC received information that the cross of Yahui Church in Pingyang County was forcibly removed.

The video sent to ICC from local believers shows that when the cross was slowly lowered down by government’s construction machine, believers burst into a tear-filled hymn, singing, “cross, cross, be my glory forever; all my sins have been washed

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A Church Asks A DJ To Lead Worship During Worship Service

A church took a unique approach to worship Sunday morning when it swapped out its band with a Christian DJ in an experimental worship service called “Church Remixed.”

worship post

The idea for the unorthodox worship service was a collaboration between Stephen Taylor, community minister for The Church at Clarendon , and Hans Daniels, an Atlanta DJ who performs under the name DJ Hans Solo.

Daniels played a blend of contemporary Christian and secular music both before and after the service Sunday, Taylor says. He was joined on stage by one of the church’s praise singers during the service, and the songs he played weren’t altogether unfamiliar to the congregation. .

Taylor says his church is attended by many young people who are familiar with the hip-hop culture.

“They never get to hear music that is their style of music at church,” he said. “And so I just really felt like I was trying to advocate on behalf of them to have something that they would like.”

The Church at Clarendon used to have separate traditional and contemporary services, but now has one blended service each Sunday morning. The worship team at the church uses rock instruments, Taylor says, but will often play hymns in a more contemporary style.

The DJ is now actively looking for opportunities to play during other worship services, he says, and hopes to also connect with other DJs who are interested in doing the same. He thinks using DJs for worship could become popular with churches in both the U.S. and abroad.

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5 Great Reasons Why You Should Stop Attending “Church On Tv” On Sundays

At times you hear some one say I am too tired today as I don’t feel like attending church this Sunday.

jcc church post

Now we give you reasons why you should attend church every Sunday or Saturday.  These are the reasons why you attend church regularly.

1. To Encounter God Through His Son Jesus Christ

“For where two or three come together in my name, there am I with them.” – Matthew 18:20

2. To Be Prayed For

“If two of you agree on earth about anything that they may ask, it shall be done for them by My Father who is in heaven.” – Matthew 18:19

 

3. To Grow in the Knowledge of the Bible (God’s Word)

“All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, 17 so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.” – 2 Timothy 3:16-17

the-holy-bible1

4. To Love and Encourage Your Fellow Brothers and Sisters in Christ

“A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another, even as I have loved you, that you also love one another. By this all men will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another” – John 13:34-35

 

5. To Find Ways to Share the Gospel By Gathering With Other Believers

“Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost” – Matthew 28:19

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